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Don’t define Diabetic desserts

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Harsh Kedia, a 21 year old from Mumbai, is a passionate Diabetic Chef.  He was told at the age of 15 that he had diabetes. The doctors gave him a long list of things which he couldn’t eat. This meant no carbs, no sugar, no fats and no desserts. After getting irritated with people treating him as i he had a life threatening disease, he decided to take a step and change all this. He did his homework and started crafting delicious delicacies that were specially for diabetics and that gave birth to his Facebook page – ‘A diabetic Chef.’

With ‘A diabetic Chef’, Harsh aims help other diabetic who he knows would go through the same dilemma he went through. We got a chance to chat with him and he happily answered a few questions for us.

Here’s a snippet of our chat with Harsh.

Q1. When and how did you discover your passion for cooking and baking?

Ans. I fell in love with cooking since 3rd grade. Kitchen was my ‘play-ground’. Well my heart was broken when at the age of 15 doctors discovered that I had diabetes hence “do not eat this do not eat that” and so on. That is when I decided he had to change this. I took a list of things I could eat and based on that I did my homework and started crafting delicious delicacies that were specially for diabetics and that gave birth to my Facebook page – ‘A diabetic Chef.’

Q2. How difficult was it to convince your parents about your passion for cooking? How have they taken it?

Ans. Family initially didn’t get the idea of it and weren’t comfortable but now they’ve come to terms with it.

Q3. What is other people’s reaction to ‘A diabetic Chef’? How did you come up with the idea for this?

Ans. People reacted very variably. It wasn’t all that easy initially, insults, demeaning and hate messages all came in. But well who cares right? It didn’t exactly bring me down it just gave me motivation to work harder each day.

Diabetic Chef came up when I was 16 and was told I wasn’t allowed to eat sweets and food outside my house, I took my passion and setbacks as a push to start something against the idea that diabetics can’t do everything. This includes eating what they want!

The concept of a diabetic chef came up as an insult when I was baking brownies at home and a friend asked me you’re baking desserts who are you a diabetic chef?

Q4. How has your experience been, being associated with the DoWhatYouLove Movement?

Ans. Being associated with YIC has been a wonderful journey for me. I’ve met one of the most talented people I know, I have interacted with ever. I met Wioleta and Kamal who are fantastic poeple who motivate young entrepreneurs’ like me and help us grow. I’ve come to terms with myself greatly after YIC and well, I do what I love now. The sticker given to us by YIC of the #DoWhatYouLove is stuck on my laptop ever since. Keeps reminding me to go harder every day!

Q5. What inspires you to DoWhatYouLove?

Ans.  A lot of struggles actually. Body shaming, fat shaming, colour shaming, effeminate behavior shamed. NOT BEING ABLE TO EAT OUTSIDE! Not being able to talk to people. Getting pittied by these lame relatives has always and will always help me do what I love.

The push back has been the push through of this.

“Life is and always will be a beautiful struggle!”

(Interviewed by Nikhil Kamath)

 

 

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Frankenstein’s Monster

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Hi, I’m a Frankenstein’s Monster.
Made by you, used by you
To ultimately destroy you and your habitat.
I was produced to fulfill one of your many needs,
But over the time,
So obsessively useful I became,
That soon I was all around the places.
In every nook and corner,
In every small little things.
Every day, Everywhere!

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I’ve become the cancer in the throat of the drains,
In the belly of the mud,
In the veins of the water,
Refusing to be decomposed,
Adamant and stubborn,
Flying in the air.

Over the years, I’ve become
One of the strongest enemies of your Mother Earth,
And it will take a lifetime for her to wipe me out.
While I continue to choke,
Its saplings, its animals,
Its humans, its oceans and its breath.
Yes! I’m the plastic. I’m the plastic.

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In this world expenses are new sky rockets,
I’m here the cheapest.
Survival is getting difficult,
I’m exchanged freely.
Do you have any idea of
what danger are you throwing yourselves into?

Coffee is drunk in plastic cups,
Food is eaten in plastic plates.
They are used and thrown freely.
Like offered to God, served to the poor,
And dumped in the Earth.

Stagnant I stand,
Suffocated I lie,
Rotten less and Compost free,
Breeding with a pace of tones per hour,
Choking the Earth breath by breath.
O wise humans, O wisest of them all
Have you really made a benefiting call?

Contributed By:

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Pankhuri
has recently finished her Masters of Arts in English Literature. Grown up reading and imagining stories, she believes that ideas and stories have massive potential to make a difference. An ardent follower of #DoWhatYouLove movement, she loves writing and meeting new people. An ardent lover of arts, culture and literature, she also enjoys dancing, travelling and exploring new arenas. She has interned with Human Circle as a Content Writer and has already prepared her bag with new opportunities. Currently she’s mastering self-discipline.

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World Youth Skills Day: What Are The Skills That You Would Love To Develop?

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In India, studies have shown that more than 50% of the Indian graduates lack basic employability skills. This means that out of the 5 million + students who graduate every year, very few are fit to be employed. If we look at the condition at a world level, a recent International Labour Organisation (ILO) publication states that 73.4 million young people were estimated to be unemployed in 2015, which is 13.1% youth unemployment rate. This figure is expected to increase in most regions of the world in by the end of 2017.

It has been observed that young people are three times more likely to be unemployed than adults and continuously exposed to low quality jobs, insecure school-to-work transitions and labour market inequalities. Women are more likely to be under-paid and underemployed, and to undertake part-time jobs under temporary contracts.

Education and training are the key determinants of success in the labour market. But unfortunately, existing systems have failed to address the learning need of many young people and surveys of learning outcomes and skills show that a large number of youth have low levels of achievement in basic literacy and numeracy.  In India, this problem is caused due to various reasons, some of which are:

  • Shortage of good institutions providing quality higher education.
  • Lack of flexibility, recognition of prior learning and employer linkages.
  • Lack of English knowledge and cognitive skills in students.

Another reason for youth unemployment is structural unemployment, a mismatch between the skills that workers in the economy can offer and the skills demanded of workers by employers. Structural unemployment affects all regions around the world and it impacts not only economies but also hampers the transition to equitable and inclusive societies.

Skills and jobs for youth feature prominently in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and SDG target 4.4 calls for a substantial increase in the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills. In order to raise awareness about the importance of youth developing skills, United Nations observes World Youth Skills Day on 15th July every year. It supports the view that everyone should have the opportunity to discover and develop their talents. Through skills individuals, communities, and countries can create a more prosperous future.

Let us know in the comments below, what are the skills that you still want to develop.

#DoWhatYouLove

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