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Announcement: Application for the 11th Young India Challenge is Now Open!

YIC 10th UN SDGs

Do you want to follow your passion and make a career around it? Applications are now open for the 11th Young India Challenge (YIC) at Bhubaneswar (Odisha), on 22-23 February 2020.

YIC is created and organised by Human Circle – a social enterprise dedicated to inspire, enable and connect young people to follow their passion and to contribute towards sustainable development goals.

Click here to apply for YIC 2020 in Bhubaneswar, Odisha. 

Steve Jobs (Co-founder, Apple Inc) once said, “The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle.”

Young India Challenge (YIC) is a two-day invite only national level event for 300+ participants from 50+ cities across India, selected from approximately 3000 applications. To help participants solve the challenge we invite 40+ Mentors and Speakers

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Day 1 of YIC has lots of inspiring speaker sessions. There is a workshop to hack your brain to turn your passion into a career. On Day 2, the delegates are given the challenge and they work in a team of ten people to solve the challenge. These are real global and national challenges related to 2 UN Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) – Goal 12: Responsible Consumption and Production, and Goal 13: Climate Action. The event finishes with an award function and certificate distribution.

Previous Partners/Mentors/Speakers from:KPMG, GE, Boston Consulting Group, NDTV, Startup Weekend Powered by Google, Hindustan Unilever, The Global Shapers Community (born out of the World Economic Forum), World Wildlife Fund for Nature (WWF-India), The Climate Reality Project India (Founded by Ex US Vice President Al Gore), Center for Responsible Business, Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil, Techstars, LoveDoctor, SHEROES, Ashoka Youth Venture, Global Action on Poverty, AIESEC, Talerang, BitGiving, Cornitos, SaveLife Foundation, Sarvam Foundation, CoWorkIn, I Impact India, DU Beat, SRCC, IIT Delhi and many more.

Young India Challenge (Bhubaneswar) – 22nd and 23rd February 2020

Click here to apply for YIC 2020 in Bhubaneswar

Watch Videos of Previous YICs in Delhi and Mumbai

Limited spots available!

Prize for the winning teams: winning teams will be awarded with a seed funding of INR 1,00,000 each to execute the solutions for the challenge, along with a 6-month mentorship program.

  • A certificate of excellence will be provided to you as a delegate for Young India Challenge 2020, recognising you amongst the top youth across many cities and universities in India.The #DoWhatYouLove movement has spread across the country and we are looking to organise an amazing conference & a ‘YIC Awards Function’ to make it even bigger.

You could help your friends by letting them know about this opportunity!

Any student, recent graduate, young professional or entrepreneur from any city can apply. YIC is a Human Circle creation for young people to explore and follow their passion with amazing students, entrepreneurs, social change makers, artists, authors and business people. This is the best place to be if you want to create a life by your choice and not what the world tells you.

FB Young India Challenge 10th Apply Now (2)

Check out the agenda, speakers, partners and all that happened during the first 10 YICs here www.youngindiachallenge.com

  • Check out the videos of what happened at Young India Challenge at IIT Delhi, SRCC here
  • Check out all the YIC updates here

Are you ready to experience two of the most exciting days of your life?! 🙂

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A Circular Approach towards the Sustainable Development Goals

Centre for Responsible Business (CRB) is a think tank focused on helping businesses integrate sustainability into their core functions. One of the ways in which we engage businesses is through organizing  multi-stakeholder dialogues such as our annual flagpship Conference “India & Sustainability Standards”. We work across different sectors namely Apparel and textiles, Agro-based industries, ICT and Electronics, Mining and Minerals. Most of our work on promoting business sustainability may be catergorized under the following themes such as Circular Economy, Business and Human Rights, Private Sector and SDGs, Voluntary Sustainability Standards and MSMEs and Sustainability. 

At CRB we adopt the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) as one of the conceptual frameworks for it’s work on sustainability. In the past few decades, Circular Economy has emerged as an important lever to support sustainable development. As defined by the Ellen Macarthur Foundation, circular economy serves as a regenerative economic system which is powered by renewable energy, where the concept of “waste” is designed out, and materials and energy circulate in closed loops for long periods of time. Reduce, Reuse, Recycle, Redesign, Repair, Refurbish and Remanufacture (known as the 7 Rs’)are the basic tenets of circular economy. Circular economy helps us to look at entire production and consumption value chains from a macro, or systems perspective, and design ways to make them sustainable. Given its focus on resource efficiency, systems and design thinking, the concept of circular economy is especially useful towards advancement on SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production. Designing products and services in a way that the by-products and end-of-life products (post-consumer goods) can be disassembled and/or recycled/reused, will make sure that the stress on earth’s limited resources is reduced. 

Through it’s project on Promoting Responsible Value Chains in India for an Effective Contribution of the Private Sector to the SDGs (PROGRESS) ,CRB is currently working with the textile and apparel industry to create strategies to enable a transition to a circular economy. Due to high demand for fashion goods and their rapid obsolescence, millions of tonnes of apparel-related waste end up in landfills every year. After oil and gas, the textile and apparel sectors are considered as the second most polluting industry globally. Cotton, the primary raw material for textiles, requires enormous amounts of fertilizers, water and pesticides, while the manufacturing process is chemical-intensive. Man-made fibres like polyester are created from by-products of the petrochemical industry, which has a large footprint; polyester also leads to microplastics pollution of soil and water bodies.

CRB’s initiative focuses on interactions within global value chains of the textile industry, i.e. how global fashion brands like H&M, C&A, Marks and Spencer, etc. interact with their suppliers, manufacturers and other associates on sustainability issues. As consumers become more aware about the environmental footprint and social impacts of their buying choices, international brands are striving towards making their businesses circular. CRB believes that this can be a huge economic opportunity for Indian garment manufacturers and raw material producers, who can adopt circular economy and fulfil the demand criteria of brands and consumers around the world. This, is turn, will contribute to SDG 12 in India.

But if circular economy or any other sustainability paradigm is to succeed, the consumers, especially the youth must start making conscious lifestyle choices and act as change agents. Once they start demanding sustainable products and services, businesses and governments will align their goals to the SDGs.

by
Ramanuj Mitra, Programme Officer, CRB 

Centre for Responsible Business (CRB) – http://c4rb.org/

India Sustainability Standards – http://www.sustainabilitystandards.in/

 United Nation Sustainable Development Goals – https://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/sustainable-development-goals/

 Ellen Macarthur Foundation – https://www.ellenmacarthurfoundation.org/circular-economy/concept

 Golden Plains Shire 7R’s-  https://www.goldenplains.vic.gov.au/residents/my-home/recycling-and-rubbish/7-rs-recycling

 PROGRESS overview- http://c4rb.org/progress

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Sustainable Palm Oil Coalition for India launched to drive India’s sustainable palm oil market

RSPO Blog 1

New Delhi, India: As the largest consumer and importer of palm oil, globally, India has the potential to play a significant role in driving sustainable practices in the palm oil sector. In order to address this, Sustainable Palm Oil Coalition for India (India-SPOC) was recently launched as a collaborative effort between Centre for Responsible Business (CRB), World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) – India, Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) and Rainforest Alliance (RA) at a global convention on sustainable trade and standards in New Delhi. 

In recent years, palm oil has become one of the most widely used vegetable oils in the food and FMCG industry, given its productivity and versatility in use. However, the factors that have made palm oil a success have also brought with it well-documented environmental and social challenges. Most prominent among these are links to deforestation, labour rights, and damaging effects on nature and the environment, particularly when grown unsustainably. India-SPOC will be working primarily with companies in India to facilitate collaboration within the industry and help improve sustainability performance across their palm oil supply chain. The coalition will work towards addressing barriers and challenges to sustainable palm oil by taking into consideration the unique characteristics of the palm oil sector in India, focusing on aspects including policy, best practices for production, trade linkages, and consumer sensitisation to sustainability.

The collaborative platform will consist of associations, civil society organisations, consumer goods manufacturers, food-service retailers, retailers, banks and financial institutions, and palm oil traders and producers committed to increasing the use of sustainable palm oil and its derivatives in the Indian market. India-SPOC has opened its request for stakeholder participation with CRB playing the role of the Secretariat for the coalition.

Centre for Responsible Business

“The formation of India-SPOC is a timely and positive development in India and for the Asian region. I believe India-SPOC, to a great extent, will address the concerns and doubts of scholars and critics who argue that the increase in South-South trade in food, feed and fibre, for which India is a leading actor for both imports and exports, may undermine sustainability issues. I am sure India-SPOC will develop appropriate strategies, plans and activities for proactive engagement with palm oil producers, processors, users and other stakeholders in the value chain to address and arrest the challenges of deforestation, biodiversity loss, human and labour rights in palm oil industry in India and the region. Many congratulations and my best wishes to the leaders at Rainforest Alliance, RSPO, WWF and CRB for initiating and leading this initiative.”

  • Dr. Bimal Arora, Honorary Chairperson, Centre for Responsible Business and Faculty at Aston Business School, United Kingdom

World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) – India

“As the world’s largest consumer of palm oil, India could play a pivotal role in promoting the sustainable production of palm oil. India-SPOC provides an opportunity for the Indian palm oil industry to positively influence the domestic demand for sustainable palm oil.”  

  • Mr. Ravi Singh, Secretary General and CEO

Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO)

“With approximately 98% of palm oil (crude, refined and processed) consumed in India, coming from imported sources, India-SPOC will bring a much needed dialogue of sustainable palm oil to India. On behalf of RSPO, I congratulate all of India-SPOC’s founding partners and we hope the coalition will play a key role in helping achieve the shared vision of making sustainable palm oil the norm.” 

  • Darrel Webber, Chief Executive Officer

Rainforest Alliance

“The time is right for the Sustainable Palm Oil Coalition. Palm oil is in high demand and provides a livelihood to millions of farmers and workers in the tropics. The negative social and environmental impacts from its production in South east Asia have been well publicised. A commitment from companies in India, the world’s largest importer, to buy palm oil produced without those negative impacts will send a clear message through the supply chain and stimulate further progress in sustainable production practices.” 

  • Mr. Edward Millard, Director

 

About Centre for Responsible Business

The Centre for Responsible Business (CRB) is an independent centre of excellence, working with business and stakeholders to promote responsible business strategies, policies and practices. For more information please visit, http://www.c4rb.org/

About WWF

WWF-India is a leading conservation organisation with a global network active in more than 100 countries dedicated to building a world in which humans live in harmony with nature. For more information please visit, www.wwfindia.org

About RSPO

The Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) was formed in 2004 with the objective of promoting the growth and use of sustainable oil palm products through credible global standards and engagement of stakeholders. For more information, please visit RSPO’s global website www.rspo.org

About Rainforest Alliance

The Rainforest Alliance is an international nonprofit organisation working to build a future in which nature is protected and biodiversity flourishes, where farmers, workers, and communities prosper, and where sustainable land use and responsible business practices are the norm. For more information please visit, www.rainforest-alliance.org/

RSPO will be the ‘Sustainability Partner’ for the 10th Young India Challenge (YIC) which will be organized Dr. Ambedkar International Centre, New Delhi on 12-13 October 2019. The theme for the event is ‘Sustainable Living’ and the focus is on finding solutions for SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production and SDG 13: Climate Action. You can apply for the 10th YIC here: https://youngindiachallenge.com/

 

For further information, kindly contact:info@humancircle.in

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World Youth Skills Day: What Are The Skills That You Would Love To Develop?

World Youth Skills Day_

In India, studies have shown that more than 50% of the Indian graduates lack basic employability skills. This means that out of the 5 million + students who graduate every year, very few are fit to be employed. If we look at the condition at a world level, a recent International Labour Organisation (ILO) publication states that 73.4 million young people were estimated to be unemployed in 2015, which is 13.1% youth unemployment rate. This figure is expected to increase in most regions of the world in by the end of 2017.

It has been observed that young people are three times more likely to be unemployed than adults and continuously exposed to low quality jobs, insecure school-to-work transitions and labour market inequalities. Women are more likely to be under-paid and underemployed, and to undertake part-time jobs under temporary contracts.

Education and training are the key determinants of success in the labour market. But unfortunately, existing systems have failed to address the learning need of many young people and surveys of learning outcomes and skills show that a large number of youth have low levels of achievement in basic literacy and numeracy.  In India, this problem is caused due to various reasons, some of which are:

  • Shortage of good institutions providing quality higher education.
  • Lack of flexibility, recognition of prior learning and employer linkages.
  • Lack of English knowledge and cognitive skills in students.

Another reason for youth unemployment is structural unemployment, a mismatch between the skills that workers in the economy can offer and the skills demanded of workers by employers. Structural unemployment affects all regions around the world and it impacts not only economies but also hampers the transition to equitable and inclusive societies.

Skills and jobs for youth feature prominently in the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, and SDG target 4.4 calls for a substantial increase in the number of youth and adults who have relevant skills. In order to raise awareness about the importance of youth developing skills, United Nations observes World Youth Skills Day on 15th July every year. It supports the view that everyone should have the opportunity to discover and develop their talents. Through skills individuals, communities, and countries can create a more prosperous future.

Let us know in the comments below, what are the skills that you still want to develop.

#DoWhatYouLove

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