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Announcement: Application for the 10th Young India Challenge is Now Open!

Do you want to follow your passion and make a career around it? Applications are now open for the 10th Young India Challenge (YIC) at Dr. Ambedkar International Center, New Delhi on 12-13 October 2019.

YIC is created and organised by Human Circle – a social enterprise dedicated to inspire, enable and connect young people to follow their passion and to contribute towards sustainable development goals.

FB Young India Challenge 10th Apply Now (2)

Steve Jobs (Co-founder, Apple Inc) once said, “The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle.”

  • The theme of the 10th YIC is Sustainable Living and the focus is UN Sustainable Development Goals (UN SDGs). It is an invite-only selection based event. Top 10% of the students and recent graduates from across the country are selected every year to attend YIC.
  • Previous Partners/Mentors/Speakers from:KPMG, GE, Boston Consulting Group, NDTV, Startup Weekend Powered by Google, Hindustan Unilever, Techstars, LoveDoctor, SHEROES, Ashoka Youth Venture, Global Action on Poverty, AIESEC, Talerang, BitGiving, Cornitos, SaveLife Foundation, Sarvam Foundation, CoWorkIn, I Impact India, DU Beat, SRCC, IIT Delhi and many more.

Young India Challenge (New Delhi) – 12-13 October 2019
Click here to apply for YIC 2019 in New Delhi
Watch Videos of Previous YICs in Delhi and Mumbai
Limited spots available!

YIC 10th UN SDGs

> Deadline for Early Bird Spots is 30th April 2019. Apply soon and avoid the last minute rush.
> Participants will be selected from across the country.
  • certificate of excellence will be provided to you as a delegate for Young India Challenge 2019, recognising you amongst the top youth across many cities and universities in India.The #DoWhatYouLove movement has spread across the country and we are looking to organise an amazing conference & a ‘YIC Awards Function’ to make it even bigger.

You could help your friends by letting them know about this opportunity!

Any student, recent graduate, young professional or entrepreneur from any city can apply. YIC is a Human Circle creation for young people to explore and follow their passion with amazing students, entrepreneurs, social change makers, artists, authors and business people. This is the best place to be if you want to create a life by your choice and not what the world tells you.
Check out the agenda, speakers, partners and all that happened during the first 9 YICs here www.youngindiachallenge.com

  • Check out the videos of what happened at Young India Challenge at IIT Delhi, SRCC here
  • Check out all the YIC updates here

Are you ready to experience two of the most exciting days of your life?! 🙂

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DoWhatYouLove Coaching

ITS FINALLY READY!!!
I’m excited to let you know, that I have launched my life coaching website! It took 6 months of preparations, and months or even years of finding the right space and the right time to do so.

So here it is! Presenting to you…
https://www.DoWhatYouLoveCoaching.com

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It is a new child of Human Circle after Young India Challenge.

Designing a website for Human Circle and Young India Challenge was much easier than for me than my life coaching website. I guess it is because of doses of vulnerability that it takes to put oneself on a spotlight. It feels scary and exciting at the same time.

And btw, if you know anyone who would like to find more happiness, contentment and a sense of contribution at this point of life, I am happy to help. Feel free to share this post or link to my website.

I would like to thank those who helped me in making it happen:
Webcontxt team and Gautam for designing and technical help. Thanks to you the website is working and it looks so amazing.
WebNamaste and Radhakrishnan for your constant support whenever I felt lost. Friends like you are gold.
Seema for tips and inspirations, and being there for me.
– To Dhruv, Divyansh, Madhav, Ruchika, Sakshi, Vanshi, Tushar, Komal, Nikhil, Mahadevan, Diana, Sapna, Ishani, Prateek, Deepali, Bhavya, Pankhuri, who were willing to share their endorsement, feedbacks and tips. I do appreciate every single one of it. You are my motivation to do what I do. I am proud of you to see how amazing things you are doing in your life.
Kamal – simply for everything! That you are in my life and that you are ALWAYS my biggest fan. And the amazing pictures you took of me that I could use for this website.

If all these years you were seeing my pictures from workshops, travels, and wondering, “What does she do in her life”? The answer is:

Finding my own way of life, creating a lifestyle around it, testing what works and what does not and sharing it with others through coaching sessions, workshops, and events.

Is this website a final version? I don’t think so and I hope not. It is better to launch when its not perfect to leave some space for improvement. Feel free to let me know what you think about it and what else would you like to see there.

With love,
Wioleta Burdzy Seth
Life Coach & Co-founder Human Circle

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Press Release: The Impact Edition of 9th YIC 2017 in Mumbai!

The 9th edition of Young India Challenge made an impact on young leaders’ and fuelled their drive to meet UN sustainable development goals, one idea at a time. The enthusiasm of the delegates matched that of the happiness team members. Over 250 excited delegates enjoyed the ice-breakers with the happiness team. New friendships were formed over steaming hot tea and the auditorium was bustling with conversation.

Kamal Seth, the founder of Human Circle greeted the participants and motivated them to face the challenges with vigour and intellect. The ‘Hack your Brains’ session with Kamal enabled the leaders of tomorrow to envision a career and profession for themselves and find what they truly love to do.

Wioleta Burdzy Seth, life coach and co-founder of Human Circle, elaborated on the different kinds of intelligence and assisted the delegates in acquiring a detailed understanding of each type. Further she spoke about important behavioural and emotional traits that are ideal for success.

YIC Mumbai 1

These sessions were followed by a networking lunch and the photo booth was a major attraction for delegates. After a refreshing lunch while the happiness team co-ordinated and interacted with the delegates effectively, they networked among their new found friends and prospective team members.

Mentors like Vaibhav Chhabra, founder of Makers Asylum, actor and director, Shray Rai Tiwari and model and actress, Asmita Sood shared their astounding personal and professional journeys with delegates and inspired awe in them. After three rounds of intellectual discussions and inspirational moments with the mentors, the teams were introduced to the challenge and the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals.

The day ended on a mind bending note with all the delegates racking their brains and ideating on the assigned goals. Day 2 began with team building activities and Wioleta held the discussions post that. The delegates learned the importance of working in collaboration and co-operating with each other. The Mentors – Vishal Rewari, Aarti Khetarpal, Shronit Ladhani, Maurici Rolo, Karan Shah, Sarvesh Pande, Pallavi Singh, Shveta Raina, Sayan Ghosh, Siddharth Pandey guided the delegates and answered their doubts and queries, helping them to shape their idea and bring it to life.

The presentations went on in full swing in the second half of day 2. The teams presented startup ideas, innovative campaigns and ideas for unique products and services. This was followed by the narrations from ‘ You Are the Story ‘ contest by a talented and deserving bunch of delegates. In the meanwhile, after thorough debate and discussion, the jury selected 3 out of 24 winning ideas and they were awarded for their excellence and entrepreneurial spirit.

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Day 2 ended with a smile on every delegates face and the room reverberated with echoes of their carefree laughter and warm friendly conversations. With a promise to stay in touch and explore more opportunities together as a team, the 9th edition of Young India Challenge brought joy and tears of happiness to many. With memories of Mumbai, sugar cubes from YIC and a bunch of new friendships each delegate went home with a heart full of passion and a productive mind!

We cannot wait for the 10th edition of Young India Challenge! Are you ready?

A big thank you for all our partners for their amazing support!

MISB Bocconi ESADE Talerang GrowthHub DU Express DU Beat CampusVarta Campus Drift Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil – RSPO Global Action on Poverty ISA – RGIT

Contributed by:

Ekta Mourya

Happiness Team, YIC Mumbai 2017

 

 

 

 

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I’d be the happiest if my act of kindness inspires even one person to donate

hair donation

The scissors snip together slowly making that unmistakable crunching sound and 08 inches of hair that I spent years growing are now gone. 

But the strands didn’t just fall to the ground to get swept up and thrown away. 

Instead, my hair went to ‘Strands of strength’, an organization that distributes free wigs to cancer patients. The wigs offered by them disguise hair loss, decrease feelings of vulnerability and provide greater self-esteem. 

You’re sending a piece of yourself to a child or adult who has a disease that’s caused them to lose their hair.

It seems to be a small thing to do but it creates in big difference for the people who are in that mess. It’s a ray of hope for them.

When I was battling hypothyroidism, there was immense hair fall that made me depressed each day. Once day I thought how do patients who lose their hair survive and made me realise that I should be rather thankful that I have some at least. 

So I thought about a haircut but came across hair donation in the meanwhile (Much thanks to Ms. Anusha).

But as it is said, ‘One thought can change your life’, the process of hair donation made me love my hair and generated a sense of gratitude.

After final haircut I just felt accomplished. My new look brought attention and appreciation.

At least once in this life, go for it because you wouldn’t know how good it feels unless you do it. 

I’d be the happiest if my act of kindness inspires even one person to donate.

Easy steps to follow- 

  • Love your hair a little more
  • Keep them clean
  • Tell your stylist about donation
  • Get your hair sectioned into small ponytails all around your head 
  • Cut straight across right above the rubber band to keep the hair together
  • Just take these pieces, place them in a zip pouch and courier it.

Contributed by Rupali Anju Arora

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Sustainable Palm Oil Coalition for India launched to drive India’s sustainable palm oil market

RSPO Blog 1

New Delhi, India: As the largest consumer and importer of palm oil, globally, India has the potential to play a significant role in driving sustainable practices in the palm oil sector. In order to address this, Sustainable Palm Oil Coalition for India (India-SPOC) was recently launched as a collaborative effort between Centre for Responsible Business (CRB), World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) – India, Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) and Rainforest Alliance (RA) at a global convention on sustainable trade and standards in New Delhi. 

In recent years, palm oil has become one of the most widely used vegetable oils in the food and FMCG industry, given its productivity and versatility in use. However, the factors that have made palm oil a success have also brought with it well-documented environmental and social challenges. Most prominent among these are links to deforestation, labour rights, and damaging effects on nature and the environment, particularly when grown unsustainably. India-SPOC will be working primarily with companies in India to facilitate collaboration within the industry and help improve sustainability performance across their palm oil supply chain. The coalition will work towards addressing barriers and challenges to sustainable palm oil by taking into consideration the unique characteristics of the palm oil sector in India, focusing on aspects including policy, best practices for production, trade linkages, and consumer sensitisation to sustainability.

The collaborative platform will consist of associations, civil society organisations, consumer goods manufacturers, food-service retailers, retailers, banks and financial institutions, and palm oil traders and producers committed to increasing the use of sustainable palm oil and its derivatives in the Indian market. India-SPOC has opened its request for stakeholder participation with CRB playing the role of the Secretariat for the coalition.

Centre for Responsible Business

“The formation of India-SPOC is a timely and positive development in India and for the Asian region. I believe India-SPOC, to a great extent, will address the concerns and doubts of scholars and critics who argue that the increase in South-South trade in food, feed and fibre, for which India is a leading actor for both imports and exports, may undermine sustainability issues. I am sure India-SPOC will develop appropriate strategies, plans and activities for proactive engagement with palm oil producers, processors, users and other stakeholders in the value chain to address and arrest the challenges of deforestation, biodiversity loss, human and labour rights in palm oil industry in India and the region. Many congratulations and my best wishes to the leaders at Rainforest Alliance, RSPO, WWF and CRB for initiating and leading this initiative.”

  • Dr. Bimal Arora, Honorary Chairperson, Centre for Responsible Business and Faculty at Aston Business School, United Kingdom

World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF) – India

“As the world’s largest consumer of palm oil, India could play a pivotal role in promoting the sustainable production of palm oil. India-SPOC provides an opportunity for the Indian palm oil industry to positively influence the domestic demand for sustainable palm oil.”  

  • Mr. Ravi Singh, Secretary General and CEO

Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO)

“With approximately 98% of palm oil (crude, refined and processed) consumed in India, coming from imported sources, India-SPOC will bring a much needed dialogue of sustainable palm oil to India. On behalf of RSPO, I congratulate all of India-SPOC’s founding partners and we hope the coalition will play a key role in helping achieve the shared vision of making sustainable palm oil the norm.” 

  • Darrel Webber, Chief Executive Officer

Rainforest Alliance

“The time is right for the Sustainable Palm Oil Coalition. Palm oil is in high demand and provides a livelihood to millions of farmers and workers in the tropics. The negative social and environmental impacts from its production in South east Asia have been well publicised. A commitment from companies in India, the world’s largest importer, to buy palm oil produced without those negative impacts will send a clear message through the supply chain and stimulate further progress in sustainable production practices.” 

  • Mr. Edward Millard, Director

 

About Centre for Responsible Business

The Centre for Responsible Business (CRB) is an independent centre of excellence, working with business and stakeholders to promote responsible business strategies, policies and practices. For more information please visit, http://www.c4rb.org/

About WWF

WWF-India is a leading conservation organisation with a global network active in more than 100 countries dedicated to building a world in which humans live in harmony with nature. For more information please visit, www.wwfindia.org

About RSPO

The Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO) was formed in 2004 with the objective of promoting the growth and use of sustainable oil palm products through credible global standards and engagement of stakeholders. For more information, please visit RSPO’s global website www.rspo.org

About Rainforest Alliance

The Rainforest Alliance is an international nonprofit organisation working to build a future in which nature is protected and biodiversity flourishes, where farmers, workers, and communities prosper, and where sustainable land use and responsible business practices are the norm. For more information please visit, www.rainforest-alliance.org/

RSPO will be the ‘Sustainability Partner’ for the 10th Young India Challenge (YIC) which will be organized Dr. Ambedkar International Centre, New Delhi on 12-13 October 2019. The theme for the event is ‘Sustainable Living’ and the focus is on finding solutions for SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production and SDG 13: Climate Action. You can apply for the 10th YIC here: https://youngindiachallenge.com/

 

For further information, kindly contact:info@humancircle.in

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India Commences National Interpretation of Principles & Criteria 2018 (Global Sustainability Standard for the Production of Palm Oil)

RSPO Blog 2

Following a successful first meeting in Hyderabad in February, to develop the National Interpretation (NI) of the revised RSPO Principles and Criteria (P&C) 2018, the Indian NI Working Group (NIWG) held its second meeting earlier this month in Mumbai, from 14-15 May 2019. 

The NIWG reviewed the P&C 2018 and discussed its relevance for Indian plantations, mills, and smallholders. The RSPO Independent Smallholder Standard, currently in its third round of public consultations, was also discussed at length amongst the group. After the first meeting, the RSPO organised a field trip in Andhra Pradesh to increase the level of understanding for working group members and allow them to interact with local smallholders, visit local mills, and also to help them to better understand the challenges faced on the ground.  

India has a legislation that is similar to a ‘jurisdictional approach’ but due to legal restrictions, company-owned oil palm plantations in India is uncommon. However, with more than 50,000 oil palm smallholders grouped in different zones and bound to specific mills, the hope is that this could be an opportunity for smallholder farmers in India to produce palm oil sustainably. Aside from this, RSPO is expecting its first Indian smallholder group to be certified by mid 2020.

Over the course of these meetings, the group also discussed supply chain models, systems for certification, mills and Independent Smallholder Credits, among other key topics. Some important highlights from these two meetings were the agreement of the definition of ‘smallholders’ in India’s context, and the different scenarios for the applicability of the P&C 2018, ISH Standard, Group Certification, and Supply Chain Certification.

The India NI initiative has been supported by an in-depth baseline assessment study and gap analysis for Indian farmers, commissioned by the RSPO. Transgraph Consulting will be working with the NIWG to finalise the draft of the NI, which will go through a 30-day public consultation period from June to July. The NIWG will then gather for the third meeting in August to discuss the public comments and prepare the final draft to be submitted to the RSPO Secretariat for approval by the RSPO Board of Governors (BOG). 

New Members for India’s Sustainable Palm Oil Coalition

There has been strong support for the India Sustainable Palm Oil Coalition (I-SPOC) since it launched in September last year, with 15 organisations joining the coalition in just 8 months. The founding members held their first members’ meeting at the Hindustan Unilever (HUL) headquarters in India. To strengthen the governance of the coalition, HUL and AAK Kamani were asked to join the founding members as part of the I-SPOC Steering Committee. 

The coalition members have now been divided into three working groups namely; Policy Advocacy, Supply Chain Transformation and End-Users, to pursue activities that will accomplish I-SPOC‘s mission to promote sustainable consumption and trade of palm oil and its derivatives in India along the supply chain, through industry collaboration

The current members of I-SPOC include Climate Disclosure Project, Colgate-Palmolive, Ferrero, Galaxy Surfactants, Haldiram’s, Dutch Sustainable Trade Initiative (IDH), L’Oreal, Procter & Gamble and Rabobank. Representatives from Reliance Retail, Dunkin Brands, General Mills, IKEA, Reckitt Benckiser, HSBC, Yes Bank and ISEAL Alliance joined the first meeting as ‘Observers’.

Palm oil is a priority raw material and in 2016, we brought forward our target for purchasing 100% physically certified palm oil from 2020 to 2019. As a ‘Steering Committee’ member of I-SPOC, we believe we’ll make greater progress towards transforming the industry in India through greater transparency,” said Jasbir Singh Nanda, Procurement Director – South Asia at Unilever.

Arindom Datta, Rabobank’s Executive Director added that “palm oil is an important ingredient for food and consumer goods, generating high economic value for global companies and for small family farms in Asia. Rabobank is involved in solutions, from the plantation to the supermarket shelf. As a food and agri bank, it is in our interest that the sectors in which we are strong are also healthy. India is a challenging market and therefore, it is good to see that several large organisations have joined I-SPOC already. We are fully committed to encouraging all stakeholders to transition to certified sustainable palm oil coming to India from Malaysia and Indonesia and also its domestic production in India once the ‘National Interpretation’ process is complete. For a significant long-term impact, at some stage, we will also need to bring in government representatives for policy level interventions.” 

RSPO will be the ‘Sustainability Partner’ for the 10th Young India Challenge (YIC) which will be organized Dr. Ambedkar International Centre, New Delhi on 12-13 October 2019. The theme for the event is ‘Sustainable Living’ and the focus is on finding solutions for SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production and SDG 13: Climate Action. You can apply for the 10th YIC here: https://youngindiachallenge.com/

For further information, kindly contact:info@humancircle.in

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Ankit’s Journey and Young India Challenge

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Change never happens in isolation and once it starts happening, it cannot be confined or controlled. I have experienced it in my journey of bringing change. 

Hi, I am Ankit Raj, and I belong to a small remote village of western Bihar. From the very beginning, like most of the families who aspire to fix the financial insecurities by getting a government job, my family was also very ambitious and wanted me to be an officer in Indian Army and carry forward the legacy of my previous generation dominated by officers of Indian Army. After several failures to get into military schools, the memorable successes during my NCC Career brought me the opportunity to go through Officers Training and also the title ‘Pride of the Battalion’. Henceforth, rather than choosing to secure the nation from external threats, I chose to eradicate the bigger threat to internal security and prosperity of the nation that is ‘poverty’.

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With 93.8 percentile at national level in AIMA-UGAT 2012, instead of pursuing business studies, I chose to go for B.A. Honours in my English Literature and remain close to my villagers and apply my whatever little knowledge I had for their welfare. That drove me to student politics, RTI activism and citizen journalism. I successfully solved some problems also and that ignited to work for impact at scale. After completion of B.A English Honours, I was chosen for in Gandhi Fellowship and got placed in the tribal block of Surat Gujarat. While working with tribal communities in remote areas, I used to come across several issues and used to feel an urge inside to solve all the problems. I tried my hands in some of the problems and tasted partial success. It made me think about the process I followed and It brought me a realization that I didn’t use the perspectives of my collegues for the solution. That led me to the realization that to solve the traditional issues of the community, we need to bring creative, holistic and comprehensive ways. There starts the search for opportunities where I may meet ‘creative-problem-solvers’ and the nature conspired to bring Young India Challenge 2017 in my way. I just grabbed it and made myself available for a life changing opportunity. 

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YIC may be several things for several people, but for me, it was a platform which expanded the framework of my thought process which made my outlook more spacious for knowledge, aspiration and vision. It stretched my outlook from local to global; and due to that along with my interest in local governance and rural development, I started getting interested in international developments and challenges. The challenge of finding solutions to global problems in few hours was like shaking your brain like anything, but with the enthusiastic team members, we could find a solution, propose a business plan and appeared replicable. This brought me a learning that solution will be in our hand as and when we want it. 

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The habit of visualizing problems in global framework and local resources made me realize the importance of even a small positive step anywhere in the world. It increased my interconnectedness, expanded my knowledge base, my network, capability and opportunities. Today, I am a person whose interest lies in foreign relations along with local governance of India.

In 2019, I am working with the National Institute of Rural Development and Panchayati Raj to implement a national project which aims to bring youngsters in Panchayats to increase the capacity of Panchayat Elected representatives and government employees and ensure that participatory, planned and sustainable development is taking place. Now, when I apply the global lens and find myself solving several of UN – SDGs. This makes me visionary and makes me ahead of the average thought leaders.  

I will always be grateful to YIC and will keep being a problem solver for the community. I think this is the best way to build the nation and self. 

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Moving Towards Deforestation-Free Supply Chains in India

RSPO Blog 3

ISEAL Alliance, in partnership with the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO), WWF-India and the Forest Stewardship Council (FSC), co-organised a strategic dialogue and workshop last month, which brought together relevant stakeholders for an in-depth discussion on the challenges and opportunities of addressing deforestation along the supply chains in India.

Hosted at Hindustan Unilever’s Mumbai headquarters, the discussions centred around the palm oil, rubber, wood and pulp sectors, as well as other commodities linked to deforestation, and looked at the development of clear strategies that can be used when dealing with business stakeholders in the country. The output from the roundtable discussion will be analysed by the organisers and attendees. It will then be used to influence business policies that encourage sustainable sourcing across supply chains and minimise carbon footprint.

CEO of the Centre for Responsible Business (CRB), Rijit Sengupta, said There is a need for creating market demand for deforestation-free (sustainable) products by working with businesses (users) and consumers. Together with partners like RSPO, the Centre for Responsible Business has been strategising ways to achieve this in India,” he said.

Bhawna Yadav, Reckitt Benckiser’s Regional Social and Human Rights Manager for South Asia and ASEAN added, “Palm oil is an important commodity, but one that needs careful management to enable a sustainable future for the communities and ecosystems it touches. Businesses can collaborate to support this goal, building pragmatic effective systems that, together with governments, civil society and communities, can be implemented at scale.” 

The meeting saw encouraging participation from some of the largest brands and financial institutions operating in India. Most of the members of the ‘Sustainable Palm Oil Coalition for India’ (I-SPOC) joined the workshop along with other stakeholders, led by representatives from Dutch Sustainable Trade Initiative (IDH), CRB, Reckitt Benckiser, L’Oreal, HSBC, Rabobank, ITC, JK Paper and several others.

RSPO will be the ‘Sustainability Partner’ for the 10th Young India Challenge (YIC) which will be organized Dr. Ambedkar International Centre, New Delhi on 12-13 October 2019. The theme for the event is ‘Sustainable Living’ and the focus is on finding solutions for SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production and SDG 13: Climate Action. You can apply for the 10th YIC here: https://youngindiachallenge.com/

 

For further information, kindly contact:info@humancircle.in

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Youth for Sustainability Initiative Launched in India by the Roundtable on Sustainable Palm Oil (RSPO)

RSPO Blog 4

The RSPO participated in the 71st AIESEC International Congress in India as the ‘Leaders for 2030’ partner and launched its ‘Youth for Sustainability’ campaign. The event, which focused on reviewing and planning the contribution of young people for sustainable development goals, was held in Hyderabad from 5-13 July, attracting more than 400 youth leaders from over 90 countries.

RSPO’s India Representative, Kamal Prakash Seth, who is also the former President of AIESEC’s Delhi Chapter delivered the opening keynote address at this event. He said, “World leadership is in crisis for climate action. Young leaders are the future of the world. Youth must step up in their communities, and take responsibilities towards creating a sustainable future. As the world’s largest youth run organization for leadership development and , present in more than 125 countries and territories, AIESEC has a big role to play for creating a better future for all.”

The keynote address was followed by a 90-minute workshop titled ‘Be the CEO you want to see in the world’. 100 delegates from across the world including countries like India, China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore and Thailand, were divided into ten teams representing the management teams of popular everyday use products which contain palm oil like burgers, chocolates, ice-creams, biscuits & cookies, soaps, shampoos, lipstick etc. All the teams were first sensitized about the merits of sustainable palm oil, briefed about RSPO’s ‘Theory of Change’  and then asked to come up with a business plan to present to their company’s board to transition to sustainable palm oil and also to launch a marketing campaign to educate their suppliers and end consumers. The winning team was announced at the end of the workshop and rewarded with some RSPO goodies. 

All the ideas from the teams were collected by RSPO and AIESEC and will be used for our outreach and education programmes. A social media challenge was also launched at the conference titled ‘Be a Sustainability Warrior’ wherein the delegates were asked to post real life pictures and videos of actions they have taken for climate change. RSPO also participated in the ‘Media Zone Panel’ which was created to engage hundreds of thousands of AIESECers and young people in general through facebook live.

“To be able to one day engage and develop every young person in the world and become the youth leadership movement, we need to understand young people, we need to become the youth-voice.” said Agnieszka Okroj, Global Vice President, Public Relations, AIESEC.

RSPO will be the ‘Sustainability Partner’ for the 10th Young India Challenge (YIC) which will be organized Dr. Ambedkar International Centre, New Delhi on 12-13 October 2019. The theme for the event is ‘Sustainable Living’ and the focus is on finding solutions for SDG 12: Responsible Consumption and Production and SDG 13: Climate Action. You can apply for the 10th YIC here: https://youngindiachallenge.com/

For further information, kindly contact:info@humancircle.in

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Life is beyond uncertainties – The spark of Doing What You Love!

Every day, at around 5:00 AM, I’d be rushing down the flight of steps to board the Churchgate local transiting through Vasai Road (a small town in the outskirts of Mumbai) to kick-start my day as a University student. In about 90 minutes I’d be at the Churchgate station at an hour of the day where Bombay still seemed to be dressed in the freshness of a golden morn. Treasuring the silence, I’d be happily strolling down the heritage lanes of South Bombay, or stop by the bay and relish the beauty of the morning calm. With the rise of the Sun, my hours would soon be devoted to attending Sociology lectures followed by French lessons until late afternoons.  Towards the start of a pleasant evening, I’d slip into the shanty slums of Dharavi and transition my role from a student to a part-time English and French teacher at a non-profit. This was what had got me productive during the weekdays. The weekends, however, were quite rigorously meant for short day trips and a volunteer project that identified me as an online English tutor for the orphans of rural West Bengal. Occasionally I’d also be gladly working part-time as a city guide, showing around hidden nooks of Bombay to guests from Sri Lanka, Turkey, West Indies, Canada, Australia, just to name a few! 

Bundi, Rajasthan

Right from my hours spent studying culture, norms, and society to exploring the diverse vividity of this globe as a Sociology and a French student, I’ve always loved the idea of materializing my learnings; in an environment that would allow me to share my skills and take it to the ones in need. Certainly, that was what led me to start working in Dharavi and eventually handed me a fellowship in rural Rajasthan. Simultaneously, my love for traveling to foreign lands and connecting with people from across the globe also motivated me to come up with my travel blog – ‘Steps and Streets‘ to share my travel stories. 

My work in Rajasthan was that of an English teacher at a rural school which parallelly also allowed me to travel and write stories during school vacations and long holidays. However, a few months down the line, a prolonged illness dropped me at the crossroads of quitting the fellowship and looking for another job in the development sector or diving into a less-promising career option of being a full-time travel writer. I chose the second one. The one that I’ve always had connected with. 

With my students in Tilonia

Tanisha with her students in Tilonia, Rajasthan

Since then, my travel-writing career has taken me to the remote villages of the Uttarakhand Himalayas, to lesser-known heritage nooks in Rajasthan, and several other parts of West Bengal, Gujarat, and Maharashtra. 

But none of this was a bed of roses. There still are days where I think of opting for a full-time job. But every time I think such, I’m turned down by a virtual loop of all the adventures I’ve had on the road ever since I got into travel blogging. Despite the pain and the instability of financially sustaining my life as a digital nomad, I’d never trade this life of pure bliss and pure struggle for anything that is less exciting than the one that I’m in. 

At an unmapped village, Uttarakhand

Ever since I was 17 till today that I’m 21, I’ve never thought of rewinding or living my life differently! As a less-experienced teenager to an ever-evolving adult, I’ve always chosen what rang with my passion. 

By the verandah, as I sip my coffee overlooking the fresh paddy fields of Bengal, once again, I ask myself, ‘how do I manage to stick to the drama of having a life with all sort of uncertainties?’, my gut simply murmurs, ‘That’s the spark of doing what you love!’

Tanisha Guin
(YIC Mumbai 2017)